“Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others. In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 2:3-5)

Transformation and thought are very closely related in the New Testament. Our minds are the seedbeds of our behaviour. This is important and this is why the Christian church has always valued teaching because we recognise that the mind matters. But the kind of mind that we are shooting for, as those in Christ, is the mind of the Spirit. That is a mind soaked in the heart and the reality of the Spirit of God. The passage above gives us one aspect of what a Spirit filled mind looks like. So what does it look like?

Well the Spirit soaked mind is drenched in the self-effacing love that was supremely demonstrated in Christ. It’s the mindset that is not just about me, me, me, but it is always asking how am I living out the new commandment (John 13:34-35) that Jesus gave in my relationships with others. Paul in Philippi was writing to a church he loved and he knew that there was some conflict. Euodia and Syntyche were two women in the church who seemed to have been in some disagreement and Paul summons them to have the same mind in the Lord. What mind? To have the mind of the Spirit, of Christ, this is the mind of self-effacing sacrificial love. May the mind of the Spirit govern us as believers.

Grace and peace from Marcus

"With minds that are alert and fully sober, set your hope on the grace to be brought to you when Jesus Christ is revealed at his coming. As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do" (1 Peter 1:13-15)

Peter has just opened his letter telling believers in Christ of the wonder and scope of their salvation. Now he calls them to align their minds with their new gospel centred identity. They are recipients of such wonderful grace and provision. Indeed what they have in Christ is something that angelic beings marvel at, something that the prophets of old longed to see. Therefore, they are to prepare their minds for action- what kind of action?

Well, Peter says they are to set their minds on becoming holy, just as God is. Far from their salvation, the grace showed to them, being a catalyst for apathy and laziness, instead it is seen by Peter as reason to pursue holiness, to pursue godliness. The saving grace of God in Christ has opened a door to new possibilities and so Peter says discipline your minds, prepare them for action- pursue holiness. What is the state of your mind, are you prepared? God has done so much for us- let us live into what he has already won.

“You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its seals, because you were slain, and with your blood you purchased for God persons from every tribe and language and people and nation. You have made them to be a kingdom and priests to serve our God.”
(Revelation 5:9-10a)

Easter is a central time in the life of the church- perhaps because at Easter we remember, the precise events that took place in human history for God to bring rebellious people back to himself. The book of revelation reminds us of, among other things, the meaning of Easter in its own wild way. In Revelation 4-5 John describing a vision of an open heaven, reveals that God the father is seated on a throne and is holding a scroll that is sealed in his right hand. “Who is worthy to open the scroll, he asks?” To which heaven and earth is silent for a moment. John weeps at the fact that no one can be found to open the scroll. But then John is consoled- there is one who is worthy. John expected someone mighty and powerful- but instead the one who appears is a wounded lamb. Those present fall and worship the lamb, they start to sing the words that appear above. This wounded lamb of course- is the messiah. This wounded lamb is alive and he has purchased people from every tribe and tongue- that they might be a kingdom of priests.

Grace and peace from Marcus

Sing to the Lord a new song; sing to the Lord, all the earth. Praise the LORD; proclaim his salvation day after day. Declare his glory among the nations, his marvellous deeds among all peoples. For great is the Lord and most worthy of praise; he is to be feared above all. (Psalm 96:1-5)

Chris Wright in his book ‘The Mission of God’s People’ said, “Mission was not made for the church; the church was made for mission, God’s mission.” It’s May Missions Month again. It is a time when we as a Baptist Church focus on missions in a special way. Perhaps it’s also a time in which we ask what is the mission of God’s ‘propelled outwards’ people?

The answer to this question must be that the mission belongs to God. God’s mission is for all creation, a purpose for all that he has made. He has chosen to call into existence a people who will participate with him in accomplishing his mission. Mission arises from the heartbeat of a God who is on a mission.

Mission is about God means He is the one who owns the mission, inspires and sustains his mission in the world. He is the one who will ultimately bring about its completion. So in this May Mission Month, let’s ask; “what is God’s mission and what is my place in it, what is our church’s place in it?” In what ways can I truly become a ‘sent one’? So inspired by nothing less than the mission of God in his world, so that everything in me wants to know and engage in the Mission of God?

Grace and peace from Marcus

Dear friends

We have a new logo! The question is why? I guess a simple answer would be; we needed an update. As great as our previous logo was, (thanks Jeremy McBride) these things from time to time just need an update. I wouldn't say that the process was a simple one. Such things are very subjective in nature, different people like different things. Nevertheless, we thought that this one fit our brief really well. So what was our brief and what does our logo mean?

Well of course, on a very simple level, the logo is grounded in our local community- and simply depicts a flowing river inside a stone, making it a symbol that honours our home suburb, “Riverstone”.There is no more to this logo than just "tribute to Riverstone." As elders and leaders we wanted our logo to have significant theological meaning and substance- to say something of speaks of who we are? So our logo features some potent symbols that depict who we are as God’s people. So what are those symbols?

The Empty Cross: 

Hardly original- but certainly significant, our logo includes an empty cross. This symbol is of course right at the heart of our Christian identity. Our hope is in a crucified and resurrected Messiah. The empty cross points to two climactic moments in redemptive history. The saving death of Christ with all of its demonstration of the love of God and his redemptive power and the glorious resurrection of Christ that so clearly reveals the victory of God and the enthronement of Jesus as Gods’ becoming king.

The River:

In both Ezekiel 47 and Revelation 22 the authors of scripture depict the presence of the Lord as a life giving river- under whose influence the people flourish and prosper and find life and vitality. It is of course our hope and desire that our church be a place in which God’s life giving presence flows like a river, to bring new life, healing and flourishing. Our logo seeks to depict this reality in picture form, to reveal something of who we are and what we hope to be by the grace of God.

The Stone: 

It just so happens that the word “stone” in the providence of God, seems to be packed full of theological weight also. In 1 Peter 2:4-10, Jesus is depicted as the cornerstone whose life giving ministry creates “living stones,” who in turn minister. As they minister they do so out of what is derived from the cornerstone- they are renamed a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God whose role is to declare the praises of God. Now that sounds like a mandate and a mission to be the church.

Sure on one level- a logo is just a picture but it is our hope- that whenever you look at it; you might be inspired, reminded and encouraged about who we are and what we are called to be.

In his service, with gratitude from Marcus
(A minister of Riverstone Baptist Church)

A New Church Logo

Our new logo is grounded in our local community; simply depicting a flowing river inside a stone, a symbol honouring our suburb, “Riverstone”. Our elders and leaders wanted our logo to have significant theological meaning and substance. Our logo features some potent symbols that depict who we are as God’s people:

The Empty Cross: This symbol is of course right at the heart of our Christian identity. Our hope is in a crucified and resurrected Messiah. The empty cross points to two climactic moments in redemptive history. The saving death of Christ with all of its demonstration of the love of God and his redemptive power and the glorious resurrection of Christ that so clearly reveals the victory of God and the enthronement of Jesus as Gods’ becoming king.

The River: In both Ezekiel 47 and Revelation 22 the authors of scripture depict the presence of the Lord as a life giving river. Under the Lord’s influence the people flourish and prosper and find life and vitality. Our hope and desire that our church be a place in which God’s life giving presence flows like a river, to bring new life, healing and flourishing.

The Stone: The word “stone” in the providence of God, seems to be packed full of theological weight also. In 1 Peter 2:4-10, Jesus is depicted as the cornerstone whose life giving ministry creates “living stones,” who in turn minister. As they minister they do so out of what is derived from the cornerstone; a renamed chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God. Our role is to declare the praises of God. Now that sounds like a mandate and a mission to be the church.